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iPhone hackers release free AT&T unlock kit [Sep. 15th, 2007|03:31 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
http://www.salon.com/tech/machinist/blog/2007/09/12/iphone_unlocked/print.html

iPhone hackers release free AT&T unlock kit
No more contracts: Within three months of its release, the iPhone has been
broken away from AT&T's network. Anyone can do it, for free.

By Farhad Manjoo
Salon.com

Sep. 12, 2007


Finally, you can unlock your iPhone from AT&T's network using easily
available online tools, without having to do any work on the hardware, for
free (free as in no money, nada, zip).

The iPhone Dev Team has done it -- the crew of far-flung, IRC-addled teens
and oldsters who for 74 days have been hacking away at Apple's AT&T-locked
phone are now offering a full suite of software and a guide with which to
do the deed. This isn't Lincoln's proclamation, but in certain circles it's
huge. It's the only software-only iPhone hack that won't cost you a red
dime to use, and it changes everything.

What this means is you can now run your iPhone on any GSM network in the
world -- in America, that means T-Mobile; in the rest of the world, it
means a lot of companies. It means that a lengthy contract should no longer
hinder your purchase of this snazzy phone. If you've had it with AT&T, you
can skip out.

One caveat: At the moment, the hack is not braindead easy -- you need to
download a few things, do some command line magic, etc. -- but the team is
reportedly working on a graphical version that will do all the work for you.

Details are courtesy of Gizmodo and Engadget, which both had the news
Tuesday evening. They confirm that the hack works.

Here's an official guide through the unlock. Here's Engadget's nice
recounting of how it came about.

And Gizmodo lists the handles of the hackers responsible for this feat:
Daeken, Darkmen, guest184, gray, iZsh, pytey, roxfan, Sam, uns, Zappaz, Zf,
and Nightwatch.

To thank them, Giz recommends you PayPal some cash over to
iphone.devteam@googlemail.com. Good idea: After all, freedom isn't free.
linkpost comment

Testing Out the iPhone [Jun. 27th, 2007|02:26 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
(Accessibility is not this things strong suit.)
Testing Out the iPhone
We Spend Two Weeks Using Apple's Much-Anticipated Device
To See if It Lives Up to the Hype; In Search of the Comma Key
By WALTER S. MOSSBERG and KATHERINE BOEHRET
June 27, 2007

One of the most important trends in personal technology over the past few years has been the
evolution of the humble cellphone into a true handheld computer,
a device able to replicate many of the key functions of a laptop. But most of these "smart phones"
have had lousy software, confusing user interfaces and
clumsy music, video and photo playback. And their designers have struggled to balance screen size,
keyboard usability and battery life.
Flash movie start
Search Results for Selected Items

The Wall Street Journal
http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;15359957;6853491;b?http://copiers.toshiba.com/index.shtml
June 27, 2007

THE MOSSBERG SOLUTION

DOW JONES REPRINTS
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distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers, use
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Testing Out the iPhone
We Spend Two Weeks Using Apple's Much-Anticipated Device
To See if It Lives Up to the Hype; In Search of the Comma Key
By
WALTER S. MOSSBERG
and
KATHERINE BOEHRET
June 27, 2007
One of the most important trends in personal technology over the past few years has been the
evolution of the humble cellphone into a true handheld computer,
a device able to replicate many of the key functions of a laptop. But most of these "smart phones"
have had lousy software, confusing user interfaces and
clumsy music, video and photo playback. And their designers have struggled to balance screen size,
keyboard usability and battery life.

This player requires a faster connection to enable smooth playback of video.



The connection speed detected will cause a potentially unviewable experience.
2
3
05:48
00:00
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Now,
Apple
Inc., whose digital products are hailed for their design and innovation, is jumping into this
smart-phone market with the iPhone, which goes on sale in
a few days after months of the most frenzied hype and speculation we have ever seen for a single
technology product. Even though the phone's minimum price
is a hefty $499, people are already lining up outside Apple stores to be among the first to snag one
when they go on sale Friday evening.
We have been testing the iPhone for two weeks, in multiple usage scenarios, in cities across the
country. Our verdict is that, despite some flaws and feature
omissions, the iPhone is, on balance, a beautiful and breakthrough handheld computer. Its software,
especially, sets a new bar for the smart-phone industry,
and its clever finger-touch interface, which dispenses with a stylus and most buttons, works well,
though it sometimes adds steps to common functions.
The Apple phone combines intelligent voice calling, and a full-blown iPod, with a beautiful new
interface for music and video playback. It offers the best
Web browser we have seen on a smart phone, and robust email software. And it synchronizes easily and
well with both Windows and Macintosh computers using
Apple's iTunes software.
It has the largest and highest-resolution screen of any smart phone we've seen, and the most
internal memory by far. Yet it is one of the thinnest smart
phones available and offers impressive battery life, better than its key competitors claim.
[iphone]
It feels solid and comfortable in the hand and the way it displays photos, videos and Web pages on
its gorgeous screen makes other smart phones look primitive.
The iPhone's most controversial feature, the omission of a physical keyboard in favor of a virtual
keyboard on the screen, turned out in our tests to be
a nonissue, despite our deep initial skepticism. After five days of use, Walt -- who did most of the
testing for this review -- was able to type on it
as quickly and accurately as he could on the Palm Treo he has used for years. This was partly
because of smart software that corrects typing errors on
the fly.
But the iPhone has a major drawback: the cellphone network it uses. It only works with ATT (formerly
Cingular), won't come in models that use Verizon or
Sprint and can't use the digital cards (called SIM cards) that would allow it to run on T-Mobile's
network. So, the phone can be a poor choice unless you
are in areas where ATT's coverage is good. It does work overseas, but only via an ATT roaming plan.
In addition, even when you have great ATT coverage, the iPhone can't run on ATT's fastest cellular
data network. Instead, it uses a pokey network called
EDGE, which is far slower than the fastest networks from Verizon or Sprint that power many other
smart phones. And the initial iPhone model cannot be upgraded
to use the faster networks.
The iPhone compensates by being one of the few smart phones that can also use Wi-Fi wireless
networks. When you have access to Wi-Fi, the iPhone flies on
the Web. Not only that, but the iPhone automatically switches from EDGE to known Wi-Fi networks when
it finds them, and pops up a list of new Wi-Fi networks
it encounters as you move. Walt was able to log onto paid Wi-Fi networks at Starbucks and airports,
and even used a free Wi-Fi network at Fenway Park in
Boston to email pictures taken during a Red Sox game.
MORE ON IPHONE
[iphone icon]
.
1
.
2
.
3
* * *
[all things d icon]
.
More Mossberg columns and videos at the
4
But this Wi-Fi capability doesn't fully make up for the lack of a fast cellular data capability,
because it is impractical to keep joining and dropping
short-range Wi-Fi networks while taking a long walk, or riding in a cab through a city.
ATT is offering special monthly calling plans for the iPhone, all of which include unlimited
Internet and email usage. They range from $60 to $220, depending
on the number of voice minutes included. In an unusual twist, iPhone buyers won't choose their plans
and activate their phones in the store. Instead, they
will do so when they first connect the iPhone to the iTunes software.
Despite its simple interface, with just four rows of colorful icons on a black background, the
iPhone has too many features and functions to detail completely
in this space. But here's a rundown of the key features, with pros and cons based on our testing.
Hardware: The iPhone is simply beautiful. It is thinner than the skinny Samsung BlackJack, yet
almost its entire surface is covered by a huge, vivid 3.5-inch
display. There's no physical keyboard, just a single button that takes you to the home screen. The
phone is about as long as the Treo 700, the BlackBerry
8800 or the BlackJack, but it's slightly wider than the BlackJack or Treo, and heavier than the
BlackBerry and BlackJack.
The display is made of a sturdy glass, not plastic, and while it did pick up smudges, it didn't
acquire a single scratch, even though it was tossed into
Walt's pocket or briefcase, or Katie's purse, without any protective case or holster. No scratches
appeared on the rest of the body either.
[iphone]
There are only three buttons along the edges. On the top, there's one that puts the phone to sleep
and wakes it up. And, on the left edge, there's a volume
control and a mute switch.
One downside: Some accessories for iPods may not work properly on the iPhone. The headphone jack,
which supports both stereo music and phone calls, is deeply
recessed, so you may need an adapter for existing headphones. And, while the iPhone uses the
standard iPod port on the bottom edge, it doesn't recognize
all car adapters for playing music, only for charging. Apple is considering a software update to fix
this.
Touch-screen interface: To go through long lists of emails, contacts, or songs, you just "flick"
with your finger. To select items, you tap. To enlarge
photos, you "pinch" them by placing two fingers on their corners and dragging them in or out. To
zoom in on portions of Web pages, you double-tap with
your fingers. You cannot use a stylus for any of this. In the Web browser and photo program, if you
turn the phone from a vertical to a horizontal position,
the image on the screen turns as well and resizes itself to fit.
In general, we found this interface, called "multi-touch," to be effective, practical and fun. But
there's no overall search on the iPhone (except Web searching),
and no quick way to move to the top or bottom of pages (except in the Web browser). The only aid is
an alphabetical scale on the right in tiny type.
[chart]
There's also no way to cut, copy, or paste text.
And the lack of dedicated hardware buttons for functions like phone, email and contacts means extra
taps are needed to start using features. Also, if you
are playing music while doing something else, the lack of hardware playback buttons forces you to
return to the iPod program to stop the music or change
a song.
Keyboard:
The virtual keys are large and get larger as you touch them. Software tries to guess what you're
typing, and fix errors. Overall, it works. But the error-correction
system didn't seem as clever as the one on the BlackBerry, and you have to switch to a different
keyboard view to insert a period or comma, which is annoying.
Web browsing:
The iPhone is the first smart phone we've tested with a real, computer-grade Web browser, a version
of Apple's Safari. It displays entire Web pages, in
their real layouts, and allows you to zoom in quickly by either tapping or pinching with your
finger. Multiple pages can be open at the same time, and
you can conduct Google or Yahoo searches from a built-in search box.
Email:
The iPhone can connect with most popular consumer email services, including Yahoo, Gmail, AOL,
EarthLink and others. It can also handle corporate email
using Microsoft's Exchange system, if your IT department cooperates by enabling a setting on the
server.
BlackBerry email services can't be used on an iPhone, but Yahoo Mail supplies free BlackBerry-style
"push" email to iPhone users. In our test, this worked
fine.
Unlike most phone email software, the iPhone's shows a preview of each message, so you don't have to
open it. And, if there is a photo attached, it shows
the photo automatically, without requiring you to click on a link to see it. It can also receive and
open Microsoft Word and Excel documents and Adobe
PDF files. But it doesn't allow you to edit or save these files.
Memory:
The $499 base model comes with four gigabytes of memory, and the $599 model has eight gigabytes.
That's far more than on any other smart phone, but much
less than on full-size iPods. Also, there's no slot for memory-expansion cards. Our test $599 model
held 1,325 songs; a dozen videos (including a full-length
movie); over 100 photos; and over 100 emails, including some attachments, and still had room left
over.
Battery life:
Like the iPod, but unlike most cellphones, the iPhone lacks a removable battery. So you can't carry
a spare. But its battery life is excellent. In our
tests, it got seven hours and 18 minutes of continuous talk time, while the Wi-Fi was on and email
was constantly being fetched in the background. That's
close to Apple's claim of a maximum of eight hours, and far exceeds the talk time claims of other
smart phones, which usually top out at five and a half
hours.
[iphone]
For continuous music playback, again with Wi-Fi on and email being fetched, we got over 22 hours,
shy of Apple's claim of up to 24 hours, but still huge.
For video playback, under the same conditions, we got just under Apple's claim of seven hours,
enough to watch four average-length movies. And, for Web
browsing and other Internet functions, including sending and receiving emails, viewing Google maps
and YouTube videos, we got over nine hours, well above
Apple's claim of up to six hours.
In real life, of course, you will do a mix of these things, so the best gauge might be that, in our
two-week test, the iPhone generally lasted all day with
a typical mix of tasks.
Phone calls:
The phone interface is clean and simple, but takes more taps to reach than on many other smart
phones, because there are no dedicated hardware phone buttons.
You also cannot just start typing a name or number, but must scroll through a list of favorites,
through your recent call list, or your entire contact
list. You can also use a virtual keypad.
One great phone feature is called "visual voice mail." It shows you the names or at least the phone
numbers of people who have left you voicemail, so you
can quickly listen to those you want. It's also very easy to turn the speakerphone on and off, or to
establish conference calls.
Voice call quality was good, but not great. In some places, especially in weak coverage areas, there
was some muffling or garbling. But most calls were
perfectly audible. The iPhone can use Bluetooth wireless headsets and it comes with wired iPod-style
earbuds that include a microphone.
A downside -- there's no easy way to transfer phone numbers, via ATT, directly from an existing
phone. The iPhone is meant to sync with an address book
(and calendar) on a PC.
Contacts and calendars: These are pretty straightforward and work well. The calendar lacks a week
view, though a list view helps fill that gap. Contacts
can be gathered into groups, but the groups can't be used as email distribution lists.
Syncing:
The iPhone syncs with both Macs and Windows PCs using iTunes, which handles not only the transfer
of music and video, but also photos, contacts, calendar
items and browser bookmarks. In our tests, this worked well, even on a Windows Vista machine using
the latest version of Outlook as the source for contacts
and appointments.
iPod:
The built-in iPod handles music and video perfectly, and has all the features of a regular iPod.
But the interface is entirely new. The famed scroll wheel
is gone, and instead finger taps and flicking move you through your collection and virtual controls
appear on the screen. There's also a version of the
"cover flow" interface which allows you to select music by flipping through album covers.
Other features:
There are widgets, or small programs, for accessing weather, stock prices and Google Maps, which
includes route directions, but no real-time navigation.
Another widget allows you to stream videos from YouTube, and yet another serves as a notepad.
There's a photo program that displays individual pictures
or slideshows.
The only add-on software Apple is allowing will be Web-based programs that must be accessed through
the on-board Web browser. The company says these can
be made to look just like built-in programs, but the few we tried weren't impressive.
Missing features:
The iPhone is missing some features common on some competitors. There's no instant messaging, only
standard text messaging. While its two-megapixel camera
took excellent pictures in our tests, it can't record video. Its otherwise excellent Web browser
can't fully utilize some Web sites, because it doesn't
yet support Adobe's Flash technology. Although the phone contains a complete iPod, you can't use
your songs as ringtones. There aren't any games, nor is
there any way to directly access Apple's iTunes Music Store.
Apple says it plans to add features to the phone over time, via free downloads, and hints that some
of these holes may be filled.
Expectations for the iPhone have been so high that it can't possibly meet them all. It isn't for the
average person who just wants a cheap, small phone
for calling and texting. But, despite its network limitations, the iPhone is a whole new experience
and a pleasure to use.
.
Email us at
5
. Find all our columns and videos online free at the All Things Digital Web site:
6

Copyright 2007 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved
This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. Distribution and use of this material are
governed by our
and by copyright law. For non-personal use or to order multiple copies, please contact
Dow Jones Reprints at
1-800-843-0008
or visit
.
Flash movie end
WSJ's Walt Mossberg says Apple's widely anticipated iPhone raises the bar for all other smart
phones.

Now, Apple Inc., whose digital products are hailed for their design and innovation, is jumping into
this smart-phone market with the iPhone, which goes
on sale in a few days after months of the most frenzied hype and speculation we have ever seen for a
single technology product. Even though the phone's
minimum price is a hefty $499, people are already lining up outside Apple stores to be among the
first to snag one when they go on sale Friday evening.

We have been testing the iPhone for two weeks, in multiple usage scenarios, in cities across the
country. Our verdict is that, despite some flaws and feature
omissions, the iPhone is, on balance, a beautiful and breakthrough handheld computer. Its software,
especially, sets a new bar for the smart-phone industry,
and its clever finger-touch interface, which dispenses with a stylus and most buttons, works well,
though it sometimes adds steps to common functions.

The Apple phone combines intelligent voice calling, and a full-blown iPod, with a beautiful new
interface for music and video playback. It offers the best
Web browser we have seen on a smart phone, and robust email software. And it synchronizes easily and
well with both Windows and Macintosh computers using
Apple's iTunes software.

It has the largest and highest-resolution screen of any smart phone we've seen, and the most
internal memory by far. Yet it is one of the thinnest smart
phones available and offers impressive battery life, better than its key competitors claim.

[iphone]

It feels solid and comfortable in the hand and the way it displays photos, videos and Web pages on
its gorgeous screen makes other smart phones look primitive.

The iPhone's most controversial feature, the omission of a physical keyboard in favor of a virtual
keyboard on the screen, turned out in our tests to be
a nonissue, despite our deep initial skepticism. After five days of use, Walt -- who did most of the
testing for this review -- was able to type on it
as quickly and accurately as he could on the Palm Treo he has used for years. This was partly
because of smart software that corrects typing errors on
the fly.

But the iPhone has a major drawback: the cellphone network it uses. It only works with AT&T
(formerly Cingular), won't come in models that use Verizon or
Sprint and can't use the digital cards (called SIM cards) that would allow it to run on T-Mobile's
network. So, the phone can be a poor choice unless you
are in areas where AT&T's coverage is good. It does work overseas, but only via an AT&T roaming
plan.

In addition, even when you have great AT&T coverage, the iPhone can't run on AT&T's fastest cellular
data network. Instead, it uses a pokey network called
EDGE, which is far slower than the fastest networks from Verizon or Sprint that power many other
smart phones. And the initial iPhone model cannot be upgraded
to use the faster networks.

The iPhone compensates by being one of the few smart phones that can also use Wi-Fi wireless
networks. When you have access to Wi-Fi, the iPhone flies on
the Web. Not only that, but the iPhone automatically switches from EDGE to known Wi-Fi networks when
it finds them, and pops up a list of new Wi-Fi networks
it encounters as you move. Walt was able to log onto paid Wi-Fi networks at Starbucks and airports,
and even used a free Wi-Fi network at Fenway Park in
Boston to email pictures taken during a Red Sox game.

MORE ON IPHONE

[iphone icon]
.
Video: The iPhone Raises the Bar
1
.
Q&A: Jobs Answers iPhone Questions
2
.
Question of the Day: Apart from talking, what do you use your cellphone for the most?
3
* * *
[all things d icon]
. More Mossberg columns and videos at the
All Things Digital Web site
4

But this Wi-Fi capability doesn't fully make up for the lack of a fast cellular data capability,
because it is impractical to keep joining and dropping
short-range Wi-Fi networks while taking a long walk, or riding in a cab through a city.

AT&T is offering special monthly calling plans for the iPhone, all of which include unlimited
Internet and email usage. They range from $60 to $220, depending
on the number of voice minutes included. In an unusual twist, iPhone buyers won't choose their plans
and activate their phones in the store. Instead, they
will do so when they first connect the iPhone to the iTunes software.

Despite its simple interface, with just four rows of colorful icons on a black background, the
iPhone has too many features and functions to detail completely
in this space. But here's a rundown of the key features, with pros and cons based on our testing.

Hardware: The iPhone is simply beautiful. It is thinner than the skinny Samsung BlackJack, yet
almost its entire surface is covered by a huge, vivid 3.5-inch
display. There's no physical keyboard, just a single button that takes you to the home screen. The
phone is about as long as the Treo 700, the BlackBerry
8800 or the BlackJack, but it's slightly wider than the BlackJack or Treo, and heavier than the
BlackBerry and BlackJack.

The display is made of a sturdy glass, not plastic, and while it did pick up smudges, it didn't
acquire a single scratch, even though it was tossed into
Walt's pocket or briefcase, or Katie's purse, without any protective case or holster. No scratches
appeared on the rest of the body either.

[iphone]

There are only three buttons along the edges. On the top, there's one that puts the phone to sleep
and wakes it up. And, on the left edge, there's a volume
control and a mute switch.

One downside: Some accessories for iPods may not work properly on the iPhone. The headphone jack,
which supports both stereo music and phone calls, is deeply
recessed, so you may need an adapter for existing headphones. And, while the iPhone uses the
standard iPod port on the bottom edge, it doesn't recognize
all car adapters for playing music, only for charging. Apple is considering a software update to fix
this.

Touch-screen interface: To go through long lists of emails, contacts, or songs, you just "flick"
with your finger. To select items, you tap. To enlarge
photos, you "pinch" them by placing two fingers on their corners and dragging them in or out. To
zoom in on portions of Web pages, you double-tap with
your fingers. You cannot use a stylus for any of this. In the Web browser and photo program, if you
turn the phone from a vertical to a horizontal position,
the image on the screen turns as well and resizes itself to fit.

In general, we found this interface, called "multi-touch," to be effective, practical and fun. But
there's no overall search on the iPhone (except Web searching),
and no quick way to move to the top or bottom of pages (except in the Web browser). The only aid is
an alphabetical scale on the right in tiny type.

[chart]

There's also no way to cut, copy, or paste text.

And the lack of dedicated hardware buttons for functions like phone, email and contacts means extra
taps are needed to start using features. Also, if you
are playing music while doing something else, the lack of hardware playback buttons forces you to
return to the iPod program to stop the music or change
a song.

Keyboard: The virtual keys are large and get larger as you touch them. Software tries to guess what
you're typing, and fix errors. Overall, it works. But
the error-correction system didn't seem as clever as the one on the BlackBerry, and you have to
switch to a different keyboard view to insert a period
or comma, which is annoying.

Web browsing: The iPhone is the first smart phone we've tested with a real, computer-grade Web
browser, a version of Apple's Safari. It displays entire
Web pages, in their real layouts, and allows you to zoom in quickly by either tapping or pinching
with your finger. Multiple pages can be open at the same
time, and you can conduct Google or Yahoo searches from a built-in search box.

Email: The iPhone can connect with most popular consumer email services, including Yahoo, Gmail,
AOL, EarthLink and others. It can also handle corporate
email using Microsoft's Exchange system, if your IT department cooperates by enabling a setting on
the server.

BlackBerry email services can't be used on an iPhone, but Yahoo Mail supplies free BlackBerry-style
"push" email to iPhone users. In our test, this worked
fine.

Unlike most phone email software, the iPhone's shows a preview of each message, so you don't have to
open it. And, if there is a photo attached, it shows
the photo automatically, without requiring you to click on a link to see it. It can also receive and
open Microsoft Word and Excel documents and Adobe
PDF files. But it doesn't allow you to edit or save these files.

Memory: The $499 base model comes with four gigabytes of memory, and the $599 model has eight
gigabytes. That's far more than on any other smart phone,
but much less than on full-size iPods. Also, there's no slot for memory-expansion cards. Our test
$599 model held 1,325 songs; a dozen videos (including
a full-length movie); over 100 photos; and over 100 emails, including some attachments, and still
had room left over.

Battery life: Like the iPod, but unlike most cellphones, the iPhone lacks a removable battery. So
you can't carry a spare. But its battery life is excellent.
In our tests, it got seven hours and 18 minutes of continuous talk time, while the Wi-Fi was on and
email was constantly being fetched in the background.
That's close to Apple's claim of a maximum of eight hours, and far exceeds the talk time claims of
other smart phones, which usually top out at five and
a half hours.

[iphone]

For continuous music playback, again with Wi-Fi on and email being fetched, we got over 22 hours,
shy of Apple's claim of up to 24 hours, but still huge.
For video playback, under the same conditions, we got just under Apple's claim of seven hours,
enough to watch four average-length movies. And, for Web
browsing and other Internet functions, including sending and receiving emails, viewing Google maps
and YouTube videos, we got over nine hours, well above
Apple's claim of up to six hours.

In real life, of course, you will do a mix of these things, so the best gauge might be that, in our
two-week test, the iPhone generally lasted all day with
a typical mix of tasks.

Phone calls: The phone interface is clean and simple, but takes more taps to reach than on many
other smart phones, because there are no dedicated hardware
phone buttons. You also cannot just start typing a name or number, but must scroll through a list of
favorites, through your recent call list, or your
entire contact list. You can also use a virtual keypad.

One great phone feature is called "visual voice mail." It shows you the names or at least the phone
numbers of people who have left you voicemail, so you
can quickly listen to those you want. It's also very easy to turn the speakerphone on and off, or to
establish conference calls.

Voice call quality was good, but not great. In some places, especially in weak coverage areas, there
was some muffling or garbling. But most calls were
perfectly audible. The iPhone can use Bluetooth wireless headsets and it comes with wired iPod-style
earbuds that include a microphone.

A downside -- there's no easy way to transfer phone numbers, via AT&T, directly from an existing
phone. The iPhone is meant to sync with an address book
(and calendar) on a PC.

Contacts and calendars: These are pretty straightforward and work well. The calendar lacks a week
view, though a list view helps fill that gap. Contacts
can be gathered into groups, but the groups can't be used as email distribution lists.

Syncing: The iPhone syncs with both Macs and Windows PCs using iTunes, which handles not only the
transfer of music and video, but also photos, contacts,
calendar items and browser bookmarks. In our tests, this worked well, even on a Windows Vista
machine using the latest version of Outlook as the source
for contacts and appointments.

iPod: The built-in iPod handles music and video perfectly, and has all the features of a regular
iPod. But the interface is entirely new. The famed scroll
wheel is gone, and instead finger taps and flicking move you through your collection and virtual
controls appear on the screen. There's also a version
of the "cover flow" interface which allows you to select music by flipping through album covers.

Other features: There are widgets, or small programs, for accessing weather, stock prices and Google
Maps, which includes route directions, but no real-time
navigation. Another widget allows you to stream videos from YouTube, and yet another serves as a
notepad. There's a photo program that displays individual
pictures or slideshows.

The only add-on software Apple is allowing will be Web-based programs that must be accessed through
the on-board Web browser. The company says these can
be made to look just like built-in programs, but the few we tried weren't impressive.

Missing features: The iPhone is missing some features common on some competitors. There's no instant
messaging, only standard text messaging. While its
two-megapixel camera took excellent pictures in our tests, it can't record video. Its otherwise
excellent Web browser can't fully utilize some Web sites,
because it doesn't yet support Adobe's Flash technology. Although the phone contains a complete
iPod, you can't use your songs as ringtones. There aren't
any games, nor is there any way to directly access Apple's iTunes Music Store.

Apple says it plans to add features to the phone over time, via free downloads, and hints that some
of these holes may be filled.

Expectations for the iPhone have been so high that it can't possibly meet them all. It isn't for the
average person who just wants a cheap, small phone
for calling and texting. But, despite its network limitations, the iPhone is a whole new experience
and a pleasure to use.

. Email us at
mossbergsolution@wsj.com
5. Find all our columns and videos online free at the All Things Digital Web site:
http://walt.allthingsd.com
6


URL for this article:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118289311361649057.html

Ray T. Mahorney
WA4WGA
moving to Ohio as from September
link2 comments|post comment

wa810 [Jun. 26th, 2007|11:50 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
Can anyone point me in the direction of an online manual for this and can any of you comment on
whether the phone can be made accessible to a blind user? Thanks much.
Ray T. Mahorney
WA4WGA
moving to Ohio as from September
linkpost comment

Analog cell service nears the finish line [Apr. 18th, 2007|06:21 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
Analog cell service nears the finish line
By Paul Davidson, USA TODAY

http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20070416/tc_usatoday/analogcellservicenearsthefinishline

Regulators are poised to send the crackling and bulky analog cellphone
to the scrap heap next February, denying a last-ditch appeal from a
business group.

The shutdown of analog wireless networks Feb. 18 will mean lost service
or disruptions for 500,000 GM car owners with OnStar emergency wireless
service, up to 1 million alarm customers and a few million diehards who
refuse to trade in their analog phones.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin is recommending
the agency deny a petition by the alarm industry to delay the shutdown
two years, FCC officials say. The industry says providers need more time
to convert analog customers to digital. Most commissioners are likely to
support Martin, officials say, noting alarm firms have had five years to
upgrade subscriber equipment. They requested anonymity because
commissioners have not voted on the matter.

In 2002, the FCC permitted cellphone carriers to turn off their analog
networks by 2008. AT&T and Verizon, the only two national carriers with
analog systems, say less than 1% of their combined subscriber bases, or
about 1 million people, still use analog handsets.

Wireless carriers say it would cost several hundred million dollars to
maintain the systems two more years, and the airwaves can be better used
to improve digital coverage.

Tell that to subscribers of OnStar, a General Motors subsidiary. About
500,000 OnStar customers have analog systems that can't be converted due
to their cars' electrical designs, says Bill Ball, OnStar's public
policy chief. Most are in 2002 or earlier GM models. OnStar features
include emergency services, remote door unlocking and vehicle diagnostics.

The company is offering a second free year of service to affected
customers who buy an OnStar-equipped car. But that's little solace to
Bob De Vries of Queens, N.Y., whose 2005 Buick Park Avenue will lose
service Dec. 31.

"A safety feature is supposed to be good for the life of the car," says
De Vries, 68.

A Pennsylvania couple are seeking class-action status for their lawsuit
against GM.

Others affected:

Alarm customers: A million homes and businesses have analog wireless
alarm systems. Some 135,000 are primary security systems, while the rest
are back-ups for landline-based alarms, says Phillip McVey, head of
business operations for ADT, the No. 1 provider. McVey says ADT is
switching over customers, but digital gear wasn't available until
several months ago. He says a "significant portion" of customers could
lose service Feb. 18.

Rural areas: Analog cellphone systems are more vital there, as they can
cover remote reaches. "There's still a lot of places where it's analog
or nothing," says Tony Clark of the North Dakota Public Service Commission.

The hearing-impaired: Digital phones create a buzz in hearing aids.
FCC-mandated noise-free models are being phased in.
linkpost comment

Philips Unveils Cellphone That Can Run on AAA Battery [Mar. 30th, 2007|04:13 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
Philips Unveils Cellphone That Can Run on AAA Battery
Associated Press

March 29, 2007 9:40 a.m.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117517452983553109.html?mod=home_whats_news_us


Royal Philips Electronics NV is introducing a mobile phone with a built-in
compartment for an ordinary AAA battery to power the device when the main
battery runs low.

The Xenium NRG handset was developed in collaboration with battery maker
Energizer Holdings Inc. and Techtium Ltd., an Israeli chip maker
specializing in battery management technology.

The AAA battery inserted into the phone can be of any brand or type,
whether rechargeable or disposable. In the case of a rechargeable, the
phone will recharge both the main battery and the backup AAA when it is
plugged into an electrical outlet.

The companies say the AAA battery can provide up to three extra hours of
talk time. They did not disclose how much the Xenium NRG would cost, when
it would go on sale, or in which countries.

The new handset is based on the same Techtium technology that was used to
develop Energi To Go, a portable backup phone charger that Energizer
introduced last year. That device is also powered by standard AAA batteries.

"Service providers tell us they want to increase [revenue]," said Itai
Green, Techtium's chief operating officer. "But when people run out of
power, the providers can't make money" from calls, text messaging and other
non-voice services.

Netherlands-based Philips announced in February that it was selling its
remaining cellphone operations to China Electronics Corp.
linkpost comment

Cellphone services add up for kids [Mar. 30th, 2007|04:11 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20070328/tc_usatoday/cellphoneservicesaddupforkids

Last year, Doug Fodeman took his 13-year-old daughter, Lauren, to the
mall to buy her a cellphone. Before she used the phone even once, it
beeped, indicating there was a text message.

The message: a "dumb-blonde" joke. It was unsolicited, but when the
first monthly bill came, there was a mystery charge of $9.99 explained
only as "download."

"I was ballistic over the fact that not only did we get hit with those
dumb-blonde jokes, but at one point we were charged $9.99 for
(non-existent) downloads," said Fodeman, who lives in Marblehead, Mass.,
and runs Children-Online.org, a website devoted to issues surrounding
children and their use of the Internet.

Fodeman is one of a growing number of parents upset by charges for
premium text-messaging services on bills for kids' cellphones.
Commercials for the services - offering everything from ring tones to
horoscopes - are ubiquitous on cable channels popular with kids, such as
MTV, Nickelodeon and Comedy Central.

While Fodeman's daughter, now 14, didn't do anything to initiate the
subscription, the most common complaints involve situations where kids
are duped into doing something that activates a subscription without
knowing they've signed up for a monthly bill. And parents often have
trouble sorting out the charges on generally complicated cellphone bills.

"I do a lot of research on how kids are taken advantage of on the
Internet, and I think phones are the next frontier," said Fodeman, who
had to make four calls to the provider, Verizon Wireless, before the
charge was excised.

About 13.5 million kids ages 13 to 17 own a cellphone, according to
M:Metrics, an industry researcher, and text-messaging - using
abbreviated sentences punched in from the keypad that appear on the
cellphone screen - is wildly popular.

Billing disputes over premium text services have spawned several
class-action lawsuits. The Florida attorney general's office is
investigating the advertising practices of Jamster, one of the fledgling
industry's U.S. leaders, and Blinko, the company responsible for the
mystery charges on Fodeman's bill.

Premium text services, which have been popular in Europe and Asia for
some time, have operated in the United States only since 2004, said
Rafat Ali, editor and publisher of MocoNews.net, which covers
mobile-phone media. Ali estimated that there are about 50 premium
services in the USA, and some have gotten attention from major
companies. News Corp. recently bought a 51% stake in Jamster's premium
text unit (known as Jamba outside the USA) from parent VeriSign for $188
million.

In San Diego, Charles Ford filed a lawsuit against VeriSign, Cingular
and T-Mobile after his 15-year-old daughter unwittingly subscribed to a
Jamster service in 2004. The lawsuit claimed that Jamster's ad practices
preyed on children and that ring tones offered were aimed mostly at minors.

"They would say, 'Text message back and be part of the Jam plan,' " said
Bob Thompson, a lawyer representing Ford. "A 10-year-old is going to
know what that is?"

The Florida attorney general's office is investigating Blinko and
Jamster for advertising free ring tones that, when downloaded, sign the
user up for a service that adds a monthly fee to the phone bill.

"They are offering something for free when, in fact, it is not, and then
they are billing consumers for services they did not agree to pay for,"
said JoAnn Carrin, a spokeswoman for the attorney general's office.

Lisa Malloy, a Jamster spokeswoman until the News Corp. deal closed,
would not comment on the lawsuit but said that the advertising practices
involved appear to be from two years ago. Malloy said the company has
made changes and also now places ads on networks appealing to 18- to
36-year-olds - not on kids network Nickelodeon.

"As a result not of the legal action but because of concern, we did make
some changes in the advertising to be even clearer about price and made
it even simpler to discontinue your subscription," she said.

Cellphone carriers also profit from the services. According to Thompson,
the lawyer, some carriers get 40% of premium-service revenue. No major
cellphone providers contacted would disclose revenue-sharing arrangements.

The wireless industry has responded to complaints with more parental
controls on its cellphones. The Mobile Marketing Association, which
represents cellphone carriers and premium-text companies, recently has
set several guidelines for the industry.

• The premium services will require a "double opt-in," meaning they'll
send a text message to new subscribers asking them to confirm their intent.

• Specific words are set up that the user can text back to the company
to cancel service, including "stop," "cancel," "unsubscribe," "end" and
"quit."

• In TV ads offering a free ring tone, a company must say whether
downloading it signs you up for a pay service and how much it costs.

"We're self-regulating the industry at the moment, and we're trying to
be very proactive about protecting the sustainability and integrity,"
said Laura Marriott, executive director of the association.

There remain, however, services that do not appear to abide by the
standards. The Soulmate Calculator runs a banner ad on the Web that
promises to "Predict the exact name of your 1 soulmate." Clicking on the
colorful ad with a drawing of a handsome teenage-looking boy links to a
website where a user enters her cellphone number to get a text message
with the name of her soulmate. But entering a number also signs you up
for a horoscope service with fees of up to $20 a month. Terms and
conditions are on the site at the bottom of the screen. The site offers
no contact information, and its domain is registered through a company
that will not disclose the site's ownership.

Lauren Fodeman, the Massachusetts teen who got the unsolicited text from
Blinko, probably got a recycled cellphone number, said the Mobile
Marketing Association's Marriott. The group's guidelines also call for
cellphone providers to be sure to cut off premium services before
reassigning numbers.
linkpost comment

FCC fines Amp'd Mobile $100,000 over phone records [Mar. 30th, 2007|04:09 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
(who the hell are these guys?)
FCC proposes $100,000 fines against Amp'd Mobile and other firms over phone
records

ASSOCIATED PRESS

12:19 p.m. March 28, 2007

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/business/20070328-1219-ampdphonefine.html


WASHINGTON - The Federal Communications Commission is proposing a $100,000
fine against Amp'd Mobile Inc., the wireless phone company aimed at the
youth market, and two other companies for failing to protect consumers'
personal calling records from thieves.

The FCC has proposed such fines against at least three other U.S. companies
since January 2006 for failing to comply with rules requiring that consumer
phone records be protected by internal safeguards. The FCC promised
"aggressive, substantial steps" to crack down on phone companies that fail
to protect such records.

Amp'd Mobile assured the FCC in a letter in February that its internal
procedures protect customer phone records but did not specify those procedures.

"We think the proposed fine is based on a misunderstanding, and we believe
we will be able to demonstrate we have been in compliance" with FCC rules
that require companies to protect personal information, said Amp'd
spokeswoman Aurli Bokovza.

The FCC also proposed $100,000 fines against Easterbrooke Cellular Corp. of
Larkspur, Calif., and CTC Communications Corp. of Waltham, Mass., now part
of One Communications, which serves businesses in 16 states.

The commission said CTC Communications could not offer assurances that
three companies it acquired in 2005 used internal procedures to protect
consumer phone records. The FCC said Easterbrooke acknowledged in a
December letter it did not keep written records for the past five years
guaranteeing its customer records were protected.

The proposed fines, announced Tuesday, come in the wake of disclosures that
detectives hired by Hewlett-Packard Co. - and a myriad of other so-called
"data brokers" - routinely acquire personal phone records by impersonating
customers targeted in private investigations and billing collection cases.

Congress formally outlawed the practice, known as "pretexting," earlier
this year.

"Consumers are increasingly concerned about the security of their personal
data that they must entrust to various service providers, whether they are
financial institutions or telephone companies," the FCC said.

The FCC also proposed $100,000 fines in January 2006 against Cbeyond
Communications LLC, AT&T Inc. and Alltel Corp. of Little Rock, Ark. AT&T
made a $550,000 payment in July to settle related FCC complaints. Alltel
paid the FCC $100,000 in August.

The FCC gave Amp'd Mobile, CTC Communications and Easterbrooke Cellular 30
days to provide more information to avoid the $100,000 fine or request a
lower fine. Amp'd annual sales are estimated to be about $5.1 million.

Amp'd Mobile is a national wireless provider aimed at the youth market and
offers games, music and videos that can be downloaded onto its cellular phones.
linkpost comment

FCC may drop plan allowing cell calls in-flight [Mar. 23rd, 2007|10:38 am]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
FCC may drop plan allowing cell calls in-flight
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17739316

Cites recent wireless industry comments it might disrupt ground networks

WASHINGTON - The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission said
Thursday that the agency is considering dropping a proposal that would
have lifted the ban on in-flight cell phone use.

The commission began considering removal of the ban in late 2004.

FCC Chair Kevin Martin told reporters after a board meeting Thursday
that the wireless telecommunications industry indicated in recent
comments to the FCC that mobile phone calls in flying planes would
interfere with their networks on the ground.

Two agencies claim regulatory jurisdiction over the issue. The FCC is
focused on whether in-flight calling interferes with ground-based
networks, while the Federal Aviation Administration considers safety issues.

Both agencies would have to approve lifting the ban for passengers to be
able legally to make calls while in-flight, an FCC spokeswoman said.
linkpost comment

Mobile Phone Carriers Insist on Fewer Operating Systems [Mar. 13th, 2007|09:46 pm]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
March 12, 2007

As Mobile Phones Grow More Complex, Carriers Insist on Fewer Operating Systems
By ERIC SYLVERS
NY Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/12/technology/12wireless.html?pagewanted=print


MILAN, March 11 - Two operating systems run more than 95 percent of the
world's computers, but dozens of systems are behind the 2.5 billion mobile
phones in circulation, a situation that has hampered the growth of new
services, industry executives and independent specialists say.

"There are too many operating systems already and more are coming on
stream, making things complicated for smaller software companies," said
Tony Cripps, a senior analyst with the telecommunications consulting firm
Ovum in London.

Mobile phone carriers are watching with more than passing interest because
the new applications they are counting on to increase revenue and profit
may make it to only a limited number of phones as software developers
struggle to keep up with the different operating systems.

Having multiple systems is also time-consuming and costly for the carriers,
which must configure the phones they sell.

Vodafone, the world's largest mobile phone company in terms of revenue, has
been leading a push to limit the number of operating systems, declaring in
November that it would eventually sell only phones that ran on Microsoft's
Windows Mobile, Symbian Series 60 or Linux. For more than a year, NTT
DoCoMo of Japan has concentrated on Symbian, a privately held British-based
company in which Nokia of Finland has a nearly 50 percent stake, and Linux.

"What Vodafone did by choosing a few was inevitable," a Symbian executive
vice president, Andy Brannan, said.

Arun Sarin, the Vodafone chief executive, said last month: "We need to
reduce the number of operating systems on phones. I'm not saying bring it
down to one, but several. With fewer operating systems, it will be easier
for content delivery."

Most mobile phone manufacturers use internally developed software to run
their simpler phones. But smart phones, high-end devices that have access
to the Internet and send e-mail, run on operating systems created by other
companies. Mr. Brannan said that in the future, only the most basic phones
would run on operating systems developed by the phone makers.

Last year, two-thirds of smart phones sold ran on Symbian's operating
system, an increase of about four percentage points from 2005, according to
Canalys, a consultant and market research firm based near London. Microsoft
was second last year with a 14 percent market share, slightly less than the
year before, followed by Research in Motion, which makes the BlackBerry,
with 7 percent, and Linux, with 6 percent, according to Canalys.

Having so many operating systems makes it expensive to make software, said
Faraz Hoodbhoy, the chief executive of PixSense, whose software helps users
of camera phones save and share multimedia content.

"It's not like with computers, where anybody who has an Internet connection
can download your software," he said. "The barrier to innovation is higher
in the mobile world."

What operating system a software developer decides to concentrate on first
will most likely depend on what geographic area and type of user it is
trying to attract, Mr. Cripps, the Ovum analyst, said. Windows Mobile is
stronger in North America and with business users, while Symbian is
dominant in Europe and with nonbusiness customers.

But despite the moves by Vodafone, DoCoMo and other service providers, the
huge size of the mobile phone market will ensure that smaller operating
systems survive, Mr. Cripps and several executives said.

Fabrizio Capobianco, chief executive of Funambol, an open-source software
company based in Redwood City, Calif., that has developed a highly popular
e-mail program for mobile devices, said, "I don't see convergence of the
operating systems happening anytime soon."

Citing Apple's new phone, Mr. Capobianco, who began as a technology
entrepreneur in Italy, added, "Vodafone is trying to standardize by going
with three operating systems, but now the iPhone is coming, so they will
have to have at least four."
link2 comments|post comment

The Ad-Free Cellphone May Soon Be Extinct [Feb. 15th, 2007|08:54 pm]
Wireless Industry News

rmahorney
(The mobile phone should not be another platform for crass commercial messages. This kind of thing is an invasion
of personal space. Mobile phone users should not be subjected to this level of intrusiveness.)
February 14, 2007

The Ad-Free Cellphone May Soon Be Extinct
By ERIC SYLVERS
NY Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/14/business/media/14adco.html?ref=technology&pagewanted=print


ADVERTISING on your cellphone?

Yes, and soon.

Already, ads are creeping onto cellphones around the globe. At this rate,
experts say, it will not be long before the 2.2 billion mobile phone users
around the world consider it natural to tune into a 15-second spot before
watching a video, sending a message or listening to a downloaded song
between phone conversations.

Or so they hope.

"This is the year that advertising breaks out worldwide," said Laura
Marriott, executive director of the Mobile Marketing Association, based in
Boulder, Colo., which represents more than 400 advertisers, phone makers,
wireless operators and market research companies. "Previously, there were
not enough of the right phones and fast networks to support good advertising."

Ms. Marriott spoke yesterday in Barcelona, Spain, where 60,000 people are
gathered this week for the 3GSM World Congress, the cellphone industry's
main event of the year. Several companies at the exposition are promising
to meld advertising with the mobile phone in a way that respects people's
privacy while bringing in new revenue to offset sagging growth in voice
services for phone carriers.

Yahoo, for instance, began displaying ads Sunday on sites accessible to
subscribers with advanced cellphones in 19 countries. Mobile phone users
with data as well as voice subscriptions would see the ads when going to
Yahoo's home Web page on their phones. They could then click on an ad to
dial a company directly or to get more information and special offers.

The advertisers that Yahoo has signed up include Pepsi, Procter & Gamble,
Hilton, Nissan, Singapore Airlines and Intel, and the 19 countries include
the United States, Brazil, Britain, France, Germany, Italy and India.

By the time such advertising becomes a mass-market phenomenon, most people
in countries with developed economies will have advanced phones that can
browse the Internet and play video, according to Nick Lane, an analyst with
Informa Telecoms and Media, based in London.

.

The very nature of the mobile phone gives operators information about their
customers that Internet and television advertisers can only dream of having.

Carriers know not just where their clients live, but where they are at the
moment the ad is seen, how much they spend on phone services, whom they
call and when, their age and sex, what games and music they play on their
phones - and how to bill them.

People in the industry say they know that the personalized nature of
cellphones is a double-edged sword: it is what makes the medium appealing
to advertisers, but many people consider the medium too personal to be
invaded by outside interests.

Some executives warned that success was not guaranteed, especially because
the industry lacks common technical standards that would make it easy for
advertisers to sell to many operators at once.

"The mobile phone can reach everybody and it's always on, but we need to
rapidly define our industry standards to be able to benefit from this
opportunity," Arun Sarin, chief executive of Vodafone, said in a speech
yesterday in Barcelona. Vodafone is the largest mobile phone operator by
revenue.

"If we don't work together, our suppliers will see a fragmented medium and
a fragmented user base, as opposed to a single, valuable medium," Mr. Sarin
said. "We need to seize the moment and work together to help ads move to
mobile. It won't happen well if Vodafone does it differently than Orange
and T-Mobile."

The United States members of the Mobile Marketing Association - which
include Verizon Wireless, Sprint Nextel, T-Mobile USA and others - have
agreed to guidelines that would limit advertising to those phone customers
who "opt in," or choose to receive the ads, usually in return for cheaper
or free services. The organization is completing guidelines for the
European market.

"Privacy is a big issue, and that has to be solved for mobile advertising
to be successful," Ms. Marriott said. "I don't think people will opt in
24/7, but maybe they will opt in for certain times of day and for certain
types of advertising."

A recent report from Informa forecast that the market for mobile
advertising will rise to $11.3 billion in 2011 from almost nothing just two
years ago. It is too early to tell whether one type of advertising will be
dominant in developed countries because the market is still in its nascent
phase, though banner ads and short video spots are sure to be big, Mr. Lane
said. Text-message ads will dominate in developing countries, he said.

.

Lowering the costs to consumers is especially appealing to the companies
that produce media content for mobile phones.

"If you can get something for half-price or for free if there is a bit of
advertising, and that can be done in a noninvasive manner, that's
compelling," said Chadd Knowlton, general manager of the content access and
protection division of Microsoft. "We'll continue to see richer and better
mobile advertising across all kinds of content."

Patrick Parodi, chief marketing officer of Amobee Media Systems, which
helps carriers bring advertising to their clients and showcased a new
service at the Barcelona event, said reducing consumer media costs was an
important outcome.

"Mobile is the last remaining medium where the user has to bear the entire
cost of the content," he said, "and that risks stunting the growth of many
new and innovative mobile services that clients might be willing to access
if the costs were lower."

While the Mobile Marketing Association and other industry groups are laying
down some ground rules, other basics are still being ironed out, including
how best to deliver the ads. Analysts said to expect companies to introduce
various styles of advertising, with possible methods including banners,
text messages and multimedia messages, as well as video spots before,
during or after a clip.

"The mobile phone is a pristine media," Mr. Parodi said, "and we have to be
sure not to ruin that."
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